Friday, August 28, 2015

Diminutives and Dogs

Here are a few pictures of my skilos (σκύλος) relaxing on a chair. 






When we pass little kids on the street, their adults usually point to Bella and say, "Something, something, something, skilake (which I don't know for sure how to spell in Greece, but maybe looks like σκύλακι?)!" Skilaki is the diminutive form of the word "dog," so they're calling her a "little dog." I think it's adorable. 

When I was researching how to spell "the diminutive form of dog in Greek," a lot of sites popped up referencing that part in the Bible where Jesus is approached by a woman who asks for her help, and he tells her that he's not going to throw food to a dog. It turns out that Jesus was using the diminutive form of the word, which provides a much, much less harsh interpretation of what went down there.

According to Wikipedia, which I take for granted as a credible source, "literally every noun" in Modern Greek has its own diminutive. Americans seem to be a lot less formal in our conversations. It's totally acceptable to say "Hi," or "Hey," or "See you," to a stranger, but Greeks expect strangers to be formal. So now I've got to learn the diminutive for "literally every noun," so I can make sure I never, never use it in the wrong context. 

Today's cool news, actually yesterday's cool news, is that the interim prime minister for Greece was announced, and it's a woman! She is the country's first female prime minister. Early elections are set for September 20th, so she may not be in power for long, but what a cool thing!

And finally, here's a picture of the almost-full moon. There are a lot of full moon parties tomorrow night, that I think are also end of summer celebrations. The Argentinian embassy is hosting moonlit tango lessons and performances. Dare I?



3 comments:

  1. Nice post as always! I heard she was the president of the supreme court...does that mean she's like the chief justice? Very cool indeed.

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  2. Nice post as always! I heard she was the president of the supreme court...does that mean she's like the chief justice? Very cool indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After you wrote this, I went to good, ol' Wikipedia and looked her up. She is a big deal. She's the most senior judge in Greece. After I looked her up, it lead to a spiral of reading about the Greek judicial system, then the individual courts, the the Greek Constitution. Eventually, I spiraled out, forgot what I learned, and had to look it up again just barely to respond to you. But she is rad.

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